Fermi’s Gamma-ray Moon

If you could only see gamma-rays, photons with up to a billion or more times the energy of visible light, the Moon would be brighter than the Sun! That startling notion underlies this novel image of the Moon, based on data collected by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope’s Large Area Telescope (LAT) instrument during its … Continue reading Fermi’s Gamma-ray Moon

A Dust Angel Nebula

The combined light of stars along the Milky Way are reflected by these cosmic dust clouds that soar some 300 light-years or so above the plane of our galaxy. Dubbed the Angel Nebula, the faint apparition is part of an expansive complex of dim and relatively unexplored, diffuse molecular clouds. Commonly found at high galactic … Continue reading A Dust Angel Nebula

Simeis 147: Supernova Remnant

It’s easy to get lost following the intricate strands of the Spaghetti Nebula. A supernova remnant cataloged as Simeis 147 and Sh2-240, the glowing gas filaments cover nearly 3 degrees — 6 full moons — on the sky. That’s about 150 light-years at the stellar debris cloud’s estimated distance of 3,000 light-years. This sharp composite … Continue reading Simeis 147: Supernova Remnant

M16: Pillars of Star Creation

Newborn stars are forming in the Eagle Nebula. This image, taken with the Hubble Space Telescope in 1995, shows evaporating gaseous globules (EGGs) emerging from pillars of molecular hydrogen gas and dust. The giant pillars are light years in length and are so dense that interior gas contracts gravitationally to form stars. At each pillars’ … Continue reading M16: Pillars of Star Creation